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Practicing the Alexander Technique – It’s All About Thinking! — 17 Comments

  1. This is wonderful. As an Alexander student, I find it helpful to read posts like this as a reminder to “undo” and “direct.” I find that while I’m reading the post I can feel my neck release and my spine lengthen and widen.

  2. Those images are brilliant. Many years ago i did Feldenkras and learned Alexander techniques- i think this could be good for further healing of my drug induced osteo. I am lucky that i am very conscious of my posture and always walk tall. great to put in the thought- like an affirmation

    • Yes, the thoughts, directions as we call them in Alexander Technique, are similar to affirmations. Thanks for your comment.

  3. The images are SO effective. What’s super is the difference in the appearance of engagement of the image with good use vs. just not that great. You can see the state of readiness in each image of good use. Nice!

    • Oh, thanks so much Rene. I was really pleased with how the pictures came out, and glad you can see that sense of engagement/readiness.

  4. Wow, a picture is worth a thousand words. Thank you for showing the before and afters. You should see how I’m now sitting up straight at my computer now 🙂

    • Glad you like the pictures, and that they served as inspiration! It’s more about the thinking behind them though 😉

    • Thanks, Jennifer! I’m absolutely loving (and so are my students) the “My neck is free!” or “I am free to …” ways of thinking/directing. In fact I’m doing an interview for the BodyLearning podcast soon about my experiences, as a follow up to the one you did where you introduced your ideas. I think they’re invaluable. You’ve made a wonderful contribution to our work.

  5. I’d love to find a place near me that taught that technique! I find myself correcting my position when I remember (like pushing the pushchair around the park or fetching the kids from school) but I forget at home when I’ve the net-book on my lap. Must improve my sitting posture (and un-cross my legs more often, even if it *is* more comfortable for me that way 🙂 )

  6. I always love your blogs, thoughts and work and it’s so complimentary to psychological work. The pictures show this so much better than written words, a note to all of us bloggers! Fab picture show. I’m sharing the link on my facebook page and (later on) website.

  7. Pingback: Pause for Thought | Body Intelligence

  8. Good post. I ledarn something totally new and challenging on websites I stumbleupon on a daily basis.
    It will aalways be useful to read articles from other autthors and practice something from other sites.

  9. Pingback: My Top Eleven Best Practices to Improve Your Alexander Technique Skills | Body Intelligence

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