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Why Do You Feel Overwhelmed? — 6 Comments

  1. Our mind scripts really can create and increase stress. I love the practice of pausing and confronting both the script and what feelings I’m experiencing. It definitely takes practice and more practice and being non-judgemental. Mindfulness work and studying Buddhism offer good practices BUT I thank you, Imogen, and the Alexander Technique for reinforcing the practice of “pause” and “Take a breath”. Namaste.

  2. I like this a lot Imogen – it helps me on my own trip into the unknown depths of my own personality. What you see is not always what you get! I’m in a bad place just now, but that doesn’t mean I must rush off to other people for help, just call on the tool kit to help me to resolve it myself, to STOP and look at all of the triggers with a bit of detachment, if that makes any sense.

    • And when you stop and look, you may reason that you need help from others. But it won’t be a pure reaction at that point. I don’t want you to rule out help if you need it! Glad the post resonated with you, James.

  3. Imogen, this is excellent stuff.
    I know that for a few days after I’ve been on retreat I can spot the stressor thoughts popping up, and sidestep them (or as you say notice and accept – which is a really good way of putting it). I wish I could hold onto that clear mind, but it clogs up very quickly.
    I used to be a project manager, having too many tasks and not enough time was a fact of life, and every morning (and weekly on a Sunday morning) I would re-prioritise – bin/defer/delegate. In a way, this made it a bit easier as I could be dispassionate about the tasks.
    Now I’m retired it’s a different kind of stressor, for the first 6 months or so I felt stressed by not having enough to do and feeling like I SHOULD be doing something. And it’s too easy to get wound up by trivia – calling the bank and speaking to someone who hasn’t got a clue.

    • That’s so interesting about getting stressed about “not having enough to do” or feeling like you “should be doing something else.” Again, it comes right back to the thoughts we are somehow believing and making true. Like with tension (actually it is a tension) it’s about noticing without judgment, and then having the option to choose a different path. It’s a practice for sure. AND much easier, as you say, when you’ve been on retreat or in a workshop or class where everyone is practicing too.
      Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment.

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